The First Morning & Evening, Part 2

Boker, our Hebrew word for morning, also carries a number of additional meanings, and like Erev, these may point to a deeper truth within. Boker conveys a sense of becoming discernible, vision is clearing, distinction is occuring, entropy – or confusion – is fading. It’s the casting away of the dark by a flood of clarity, and it has become synonymous with dawn or morning.

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The First Morning & Evening, Part 1

Returning to our Scriptures, we read in verses 3 – 5: And God said, Let there be light: and there was light. And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness. And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And the evening and the morning were the first day.” How many times have we read that? It’s a fairly familiar passage, but in its familiarity, have you ever noticed the order of the words? The phrasing does a good job at provoking curiosity when we do indeed ponder on it long enough to notice that it says “the evening and the morning” were the first day?

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Let Light Be, Part 1

As we continue reading in the first chapter of Genesis, we see that – though darkness and confusion may have permeated the expanse of the universe – the Spirit of God was not content to let this condition rule. We read that “the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.” The implications of the underlying language seem to present the Spirit of God as extremely attentive and lovingly involved in the nature of this early universe. What comes next is highly significant. What we have the first direct quote of the Creator of the universe: And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.”

 

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A Misunderstanding Resolved

Consider those words and phrases we looked at in Genesis 2, especially the Greek Septuagint version: In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. But the earth became without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep.” While there are certainly some valid linguistic points associated with this rendering, could the explanation be simply that we have overlooked something critical?

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Gravity, Time, & Perspective

Finishing up our look at White Hole Cosmology, we find that in the end, the white hole would have come to a close as the balance of the material within it transcended its event horizon. By that point, Earth, which would have been relatively near its core, would have “ascended the gravity well” of that place, entering into a chronological frame of reference that was essentially flowing at the same general pace as the rest of the universe.

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A Light in the Darkness, Part 1

As we continue on, let us consider again verses 2 – 4 of the first chapter of Genesis:

“And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And God said, Let there be light: and there was light. And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness.”

From the darkness came light at the call of the Creator. No believer doubts this claim. That said, when we take these passages together, along with some technical insights that have came about in recent years, we find a stunning alternative to the Gap Theory.

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A Dark & Empty Place, Part 2

The Gap Theory is a notion which posits that there is a gap or break – spanning an unknown period of time – in the line of events described in the first two verses of Genesis. The idea was first suggested in the early 1800s by Thomas Chalmers, and though speculative, it has been supported by such commentators as G.H. Pember, D.G. Barnhouse, G. Campbell Morgan and others. By their reasoning, theorists envision an initial, complete creation and a primordial earth populated by ancient life and a pre-adamic race of man. During this time, they say the angel Lucifer fell, who then lashed out and destroyed the initial creation, ultimately leaving it an empty wasteland. Is it so though…

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A Dark & Empty Place, Part 1

Among the many controversial passages of the opening chapters of Genesis, the second verse of the first chapter stands out as a particularly provocative one. What does the phrasing “the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep” allude to? Is it a straightforward, literal remark, or is it to be taken as a hint of something deeper?

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